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Superyacht Stewardess

The Mediterranean season is in full swing and for many superyacht stewardesses, this means long hours, difficult guests and draining colleagues.

It’s right about this time that the stewardess is not looking out to sea or enjoying the beautiful sunshine, but rather at the mountain high pile of towels in the laundry, dirty cabins and running from one of the yacht to the other, making sure that the guests have everything that they need and want.

Everyone desires a meaningful and fulfilling professional life. When you’re happy with your work, you feel more content, purposeful, and complete.

When you’re unhappy at work, the days seem long, you miss home, friends and family, and the daily stresses and negativity can build up and up until there is little room to conceal your feelings any more.

This can lead to poor decision making,  a change in your personality, poor work performance and depression. The work of a superyacht stewardess can be mundane and boring, so it is right about this time that you may be asking yourself “What am I Doing Here”?

Whatever your motivation or trigger is that has led you to the point of resignation, ask yourself the following questions before you throw in the towel.

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Questions to Ask Yourself If You want to Leave the Yachting Industry

1. Why am I unhappy with this job?

Understand where your unhappiness comes from — is it specific to the type of work you do, who you work for, or is there a personality clash on board? This is a great starting point for understanding your unhappiness and a great place to make a change.

2. Do I need a job change or a life change? 

Ask yourself: Is my unhappiness about my job, or life in general? Unhappiness in one part of life can have a cascading effect on the rest of what we do. Before taking action, make sure your focus is to resolve the primary cause of your discontent.

3. What are your professional goals?

What do you want to achieve professionally, and when? Are you currently on the path to achieve those goals? If not, what do you need to do or change about your current job and career path to get there?

4. What’s been missing for you professionally?

What are you lacking in your professional life? Recognition, compensation or advancement? When you know what’s missing, you can make plans to fill in the gaps, in your current position or elsewhere.

5. Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 10? 20?

Envisioning your future self is a great way to keep the bigger picture in mind. A simple envisioning exercise: close your eyes, clear the mind with a few minutes of breath awareness, meditation, and then look ahead five, 10 or 20 years.

  • Where are you working?
  • What have you achieved?
  • What does the rest of your life look like?

When you open your eyes, jot down what you saw. You can then take action to align your present life with the future.

6. What do you feel you were put on this earth to do?

This question is hard for many people but warrants deep thought if you’re considering a career change.

  • What do you feel in your heart you’re meant to do?
  • What work would bring you deep happiness and meaning to your life?

This may be something you can do outside of your current job – as a hobby or part-time interest. Or it might be worth pursuing wholeheartedly as a career.

Undertaking self-exploration work will allow you to understand what you need to be more fulfilled professionally. If you have financial obligations and other considerations that preclude making a significant job change, look for ways to incorporate what you learned about yourself in other areas of life.

Take action. Move towards the activities, interests, and people that resonate with you, and fulfilment will follow.